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Magic144
Descriptions
Hi, I'm fairly new here, and I am presently writing a story (obviously). In my story I try my hardest to describe the character's surroundings, with similes, and personifications. I'm not saying I'm great at it, but I'm starting to wonder if people might find long descriptions boring. And if so, could anybody give advice of how to describe a scene, without losing track of the story's plot? See, I was inspired by William Golding-author of 'Lord of the Flies', and the way he could paint an image in the readers head was amazing. So, if anyone has a piece of advice on this fact, I'd appreciate it.
Thanks,Magic144
pinkfroggie06 Nobody likes long boring descriptions. It loses the reader's attention. It is best to mix together verbs and descriptions. If you are trying to describe a character's surroundings then as they do things then descibe where they are or what an object looks like...but don't get so caught up in describing their surrounding that you forget that your character is doing something!!! In short, have an even mix f verbs and descriptions. And with a scene just have the character do something then describe it then repeat these steps. But you can't keep on having your character take one step and then you describe it (LOL. Unless the scene is dramatic) Pretty simple, same thing, basically. Oh! And neer forget to double space!!! (Sorry if I have some mispelled words!!!)

P.S. I remember you!!!! You reviewed my poem "Make Sense"!!!

Good Luck!!! Any other questions, ASK!!! Or you can e-mail me at pinkfroggie06@yahoo.com

I wish you the best of luck!!!!

Hugs and Kisses: Pinkfroggie06
Magic144 Thanks pinkfroggie06, that actually makes a lot of sense. Don't worry, I don't describe a character's surrounding at every step they make lol. So thanks, and I will review more of your poems, if you want me to.
Magic144:)
Magic144 Thanks pinkfroggie06, that actually makes a lot of sense. Don't worry, I don't describe a character's surrounding at every step they make lol. So thanks, and I will review more of your poems, if you want me to.
Magic144:)
Michelle Actually, I'm not sure what mixing verbs and descriptions means. I tend to use verbs quite frequently. Usually in every sentence (not this one, though). That includes (verb!) descriptions:)

Anyway. There was a time when authors attempted to translate every aspect of reality into fiction, which resulted in pages and pages of descriptions (and yawns on my part). Luckily, that time has been over for over 100 years now. Personally, I tend to be bored by descriptions pretty quickly. First, it doesn't move the story along. Second, it hinders my imagination to come up with own descriptions for things.

But since you can't do without descriptions (your plot would float in something resembling deep space), I try to write descriptions that are also pointing at something else. A very clichéd example would be the dark and rainy street to evoke a feeling of dread, horror and fear. You can't always do that, because it'll seem forced.

Maybe that helps a little?
HRT With fanfiction, it's not very necessary to give physical descriptions of characters, since the readers are expected to know enough canon to be able to picture them already. Also, the descriptions readers DO use can be maddening. If I read about another 'pink-haired ball of fluff' in the fandom I write in, I'm going to scream.

In original fiction, the reader needs more visual help, but provide just enough description to do the job, and no more. As Michelle says, it can be dull if you load the reader with too much. There's a difference between being an author and being an interior decorator. The amount you use depends on your personal taste, however. I dislike description myself, but use much more it in my original fiction than my fanfiction because it's necessary. With fanfiction I get to cheat and skip straight to the interesting parts.

A good suggestion for fanfiction is to reserve elaborate physical description for new characters, objects not in canon that need depiction, and anything else that needs a special focus because of the plot. Put description in passages where it seems logical, and obey rules like 'When someone's bleeding to death on the floor, don't stop to describe the furniture.' Avoid giving an original character tons of description when you don't do this to the canon characters, because that makes you look like you're writing a Mary Sue or Gary Stu. Also, try to be subtle about it. Don't pile all the character's traits in one big paragraph the second s/he steps into the story, just work parts in discretely. As for scenery/setting, if you're good at it (and some writers really are marvelous at it), write what you want. If you're not so good, don't dwell on it. There's no point in making it blaring clear to the reader that you suck at description by producing mountains of it. However, it's good practice to tackle any part of writing you think is hard, because the more you struggle to improve, the better you'll get.
Plutospawn Descriptions are important, but there has to be some degree of balance in a story. Knowing what's a necessary description and what's just window dressing.

I think it was Stephen King that explained it roughly as, if a table is important for your plot, say there's a table, but just a table. Don't explain that it's wood or metal or stone or whatever if it's not necessary to the plot, because the reader will be able to visualize their own individual table better without your descriptors hindering their imagination.

Half the time, I don't even really give my characters in depth physical description, because it's not nearly as important as what they say or do during the course of the story. But if your heroine has brown eyes when both of her "biological" parents have blue eyes, it's definitely worth a mention.

But if you like meatier, less sparse prose than myself, it's perfectly valid to describe your characters and settings. Just don't bring the story to a grinding halt to present the reader with a page worth of nothing but description. It can be slipped into the prose, like instead of "she blinked," it could be, "she blinked her brown eyes." (These are just examples, mind you, not totally awesome writing(TM), hahaha.)
Nessrox444 It all depends on your writing style. Mine is more to the point but if you like writing long descriptions go for it. If you don't want to then don't. I guess that's really all the advice I can give.
Nessrox444 It all depends on your writing style. Mine is more to the point but if you like writing long descriptions go for it. If you don't want to then don't. I guess that's really all the advice I can give.
PikaBot Huge amount of physical description is not needed. Just look at Steven King: The fat kid from IT is...fat. And wears glasses. That's it.

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